Indian Summer: The mystic caves

After a 600 Km long train ride from Ahmedabad, we arrived to Aurangabad without to many expectations about this town, and rightly so. Nevertheless, it is the best place to stay one or two nights if you want to see the caves of Ellora and Ajanta. For me, it was a nightmarish period, as I finally got the “Deli belly” thing. And I got it real bad. I was so weak that my wife had to push me up the stairs while we were exploring the caves and I had to stop and lie down every ten minutes. When one sees the shots taken, no one can guess the miserable state of the photographer.

The caves of Ellora and Ajanta represent the apogee of rock carved religious architecture in India and are truly spectacular.

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16 responses

  1. Amazing.

    November 13, 2012 at 21:44

    • António Marques

      Thanks.

      November 14, 2012 at 12:39

  2. Great set of images.

    November 13, 2012 at 21:54

    • António Marques

      Thank you, Adrian.

      November 14, 2012 at 12:15

  3. Impressive series, António. This place seems really marvelous. Your images reflects the grandeur of this place but also the curiosity and the interest of the visitors. Thanks for sharing!

    November 13, 2012 at 22:50

    • António Marques

      Appreciate your feedback, Oriol.

      November 14, 2012 at 12:18

  4. I THINK ONE TIME BEFORE I MENTIONED THE BOOK – PASSAGE TO INDIA by FORRESTER – I THINK YOU WOULD FIND IT VER INTERESTING BECAUSE AS I LOOK AT THESE CAVES, I AM REMINDED OF THAT BOOK ONE MORE TIME. THANK YOU FOR THE BEAUTIFUL PICTURES AND BE CAREFUL!!

    November 14, 2012 at 00:25

    • António Marques

      Haven’t red the book but watched David Lean’s movie… But I think no book or film – or photo, as a matter of fact – can really come close to the real thing, for better or for worse…
      Thanks for stopping by, Marialla.

      November 14, 2012 at 12:29

  5. Really beautiful, the black and white images add so much depth and heaviness. I can feel the sacredness and a sense of mystery to the place.

    November 14, 2012 at 07:08

    • António Marques

      These two places have a truly symbolic meaning for Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism followers and their atmosphere is unique. I quickly understood that B&W was much more appropriate because of the intricate form factor and the aggressive extremes between light and dark.
      Cheers, Martine.

      November 14, 2012 at 12:38

  6. Nice shots, and all well exposed considering you’re using digital (I hate the ugly highlights of digital B&W, but that’s not your fault). There are some nice ones in this set, looks like you had a great time.

    November 14, 2012 at 13:19

    • António Marques

      Thanks, Trevor. There is always some highlight clipping but shooting in raw format makes it possible to recover some exposure latitude. It’s a tedious task though, compared with the readiness of Jpegs straight from the camera…

      November 14, 2012 at 16:17

  7. toemailer

    Wow! We would love to post the top picture and a few others at toemail if you do not mind? http://toemail.wordpress.com

    December 5, 2013 at 02:58

    • António Marques

      Be my guest!

      December 5, 2013 at 10:08

      • toemailer

        It’s posted now. Thanks again, it’s always very much appreciated! 🙂

        December 7, 2013 at 23:27

  8. toemailer

    Thanks! Will let you know when it is posted.

    December 5, 2013 at 18:33

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